Rook

Rook

Rooks breed in colonies high up in the tops of trees. These colonies can be very large. They nest very early in the spring, often before the new buds of spring start to appear. The nest is built by the female but the building material is supplied by the male. The twigs that the nests are built from are held together by soil and lined with grass, old leaves and moss. The nest is large and can be easily seen as there are no leaves on the trees. The female lays 3 to 7 eggs. The smooth, glossy blue/green eggs have dark blackish to green speckles. The eggs are quite large and can be about 40 mm long. The incubation period can be around 16 days but can take up to 3 weeks. Both adults feed the young with leather jackets and wireworms they collect from the freshly ploughed spring fields. The young Rooks will fledge after 30-34 days.
The Rook is often confused with the Carrion Crow. The Rook has black feathers often showing a blue or bluish-purple sheen in bright sunlight. Rooks are distinguished from Crows by the bare grey-white skin around the base of the adult’s bill in front of the eyes and their thick thigh feathers. The rook has a longer bill than the Carrion Crow.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.